B: Chassis repairs & fixes…

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Brakes…

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Parking Brake…

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Leaking Differential…

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Wheel bearings…

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Tires & Wheels…

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Replacing Shocks

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Chassis Water System

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Uncategorized Chassis Repairs & Fixes…

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3 Responses to B: Chassis repairs & fixes…

  1. Steve Dow says:

    If your Intellitec load disconnect relays get flakey, (both of mine did) it is easy to open them up to clean the contacts. Saves the cost of an expensive ($60) latching relay.

    Thanks for the tip Steve, I’ll keep that in mind.

    Also, be aware that a standard starting relay isn’t continuous duty rated – the coil may get hot and fail.

    Having worked as a test engineer for the electrical fork lift division of Hyster Co., I have years of experience with relays so I knew enough to buy a ‘continuous duty’ replacement from an auto parts store. Cost around $26 instead of the normal $9 for a regular type.

    I enjoy your adventures…

    Thanks very much…

    Best regards, Same to you and yours…

    Steve Dow

  2. LOVE YOUR WEBSITE (COMMON SENSE)
    I HAVE A 1985 TIFFIN ALLEGRO 27 FT.
    CLASS A 454 CHEVROLET ON A P-30 CHASIS
    I REPLACED THE MASTER CYLINDER AT A COST OF AROUND $50.00 IT ALSO HAS A HYDRO BOOST SYSTEM–I WANT TO DO A COMPLETE BRAKE JOB ON SAME INCLUDING NEW CALIPERS AND NEW WHEEL CYLINDERS LEFT REAR WHEEL CYLINDER LEAKS —
    HAVE YOU HAD OR KNOW ANYONE WHO HAS DONE THIS–IT HAS DUALLIES AND I KNOW AXLE HAS TO BE PULLED–ANY SUGGESTIONS–

    Wow, Jerry, $50 for a master cylinder? Rebuilt? I talked to many a mechanic and they all said that a cylinder as big as mine was seldom rebuilt so I didn’t go that route, (and I couldn’t find a place that did it either). Then I couldn’t find a used one on the junk yard circuit…did not find one at any of those RV tear down & resell lots either. But I’m happy having a new one for $500.
    I’m not a mechanic unless I have to be so I can’t help you with your other questions. I would suggest that you join a group called RV.net and ask your questions there. They will steer you in the right direction.

  3. Doug says:

    Hi! I was reading posts about replacing the fuel pump and someone had to cut a hole in the floor to get to it. You mentioned that c it wasn’t necessary, that you could just install an inline pump. Is this true? If so, could you expand on this? I am in dire need of some help! I’m old and by myself and I tried cutting the floor out. Too afraid I will cut something important if I go thru the last barrier above the tank. Will you please help? Thank cyou in advance!!


    Yeah, Doug, replacing an in-the-tank fuel pump is seldom necessary except when it’s been plugged somehow. Kids putting dirt in the tank, rust in the tank that broke free and was sucked into the pump, or a broken impeller inside the pump blocking flow. Many shops never mention external pumps because they would lose hundreds compared to dropping the tank and replacing it. Some mechanics still try to tell people that there are bad pumps in car, truck, or RV tanks that won’t let you draw fuel, and that was true for just a few thousand Ford pumps nearly 20 years ago, but hasn’t been since.

    The vast majority of fuel pumps stop pumping from electrical problems. Either external, or internal…ie, the motor dies. These types of failures are prime candidates for an external pump.

    Here’s what I’d suggest you do; ask one of your neighbors or friends for help in running some mechanical & electrical tests to make sure it’s a pump problem.

    Shut down everything in the vehicle that might make noise when you turn on the key. Turn on the key and listen with a mechanics stethoscope on the tank. Can you hear the pump run for 2-4 seconds and then turn off? Can you hear any relays click? If you don’t, check your fuses. If you do, good sign. Move on to the next test.

    Disconnect the fuel hose at the engine. Put a plastic jug on the engine end of the hose and again turn on the key. Any fuel? Good. Now borrow a pump pressure gauge from someone and measure the pressure. If no fuel, continue.

    If no fuel came out of the hose the last test, go to an automotive store and buy a plastic fuel syphon device. Test your fuel line. If you get fuel out, then you certainly CAN use an external pump. I didn’t bother with this step, I just bought the pump and some fittings and fuel hose and connected it all up.

    Go to NAPA (higher quality pumps) and buy an external pump. You’ll need to run a wire (or find one already on the engine) from IGN, wherever you find it, to the pump for it’s positive lead, and find a ground for the negative. Or sometimes the case will be ground so you only need to clamp it to metal.

    The pump can go anywhere you can find the fuel hose and a convenient wire to power it. I’d put a fuel filter right on the input side.

    Any more questions about the pump? If so, ask away, but tell me what kind of vehicle we’re talking about. Car, van, boat, gas RV, diesel RV? How old?

    Jim

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